“Bad Feminist”: A Lesson in Discomfort

Reading Bad Feminist made me feel the same way I used to after leaving my Fictions of Black Identity class in college. I spent the first two classes speaking up, as I usually did in small seminars, and then stewing with this nauseating feeling of discomfort knotting in my stomach. The knot grew bigger and…

Book Review: African-American Classics: Graphic Classics Volume Twenty-Two

I have a hidden talent: I am rather gifted at randomly finding historical graphic novels about/written by Black people. This is the third of it’s kind that I’ve happened upon in the last few months, and it’s amazing. Turns out, Eureka Productions produces a series of “Graphic Classics” that adapts, you guessed it, classics into…

Book Review: March by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, & Nate Powell

As a lover of literature, art and Blackness, few things make me happier than Black art; specifically, graphic novels about Black history. It brings together all of my favorite things: intentional word, poignant images and the unadulterated truth of the Black experience in America. During one of my habitual adventures in my local Barnes and…

When you see no future

There comes a point where I become nauseous reblogging posts about Ferguson, about the men and women also killed by police brutality and about the blatant racism still alive today. I cried Monday night for so many reasons. I cried because of the refusal to indict. I cried because of frustration at Obama (which I…

Praising History

I have been quite aware of the white washing history trend of history textbooks. I have been aware of the fact that there is always a separate chapter on African-Americans and our history that has always been marvelously unconnected to the rest of the text, as if we were not there for the Revolution, the…